Diet Guide for a People with Hypertension

Coming up with a diet plan if you’re hypertensive will help maximize the effect of the medications you’re taking to control your blood pressure. But dieting doesn’t just mean eating a small serving of food, because that will have a negative impact on your overall health.

The goal of a diet plan is to reduce the risk of heart attack and other complications that arise from your condition. However, you need to remember that there is no one diet plan for everyone, so consult your dietitian about coming up with healthy meals and treat this only as a general guide.

Factors You Can and Can’t Control

Hypertension is a disease that can be treated but not cured, which means that you will have to live with the condition for the rest of your life. But like all chronic illnesses, there are factors you can control to keep your blood pressure level at normal.

You cannot control your age or the manifestation of cardiovascular diseases in your family, but you can control your cholesterol levels, blood glucose levels, and weight. A hypertensive patient’s diet is not just about eating healthy and exercising regularly, but how to eat properly without losing important nutrients and knowing how much exercise you need.

Your Diet Should Be Complete

You will have to cut down on your intake of certain types of food if you’re hypertensive, but you should still have a complete healthy meal, so that your body gets all the nutrients it needs. Your meals should have fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, nuts and legumes, non-tropical vegetable oils, and skinless poultry and fish.

Adequate Salt Intake for a Hypertensive

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the recommended daily intake of salt should be limited to less than 5 grams. While there are other factors in your diet and lifestyle that can affect your blood pressure, doctors point to salt as the primary suspect. But why does salt affect your blood pressure significantly?

Too much salt in your food will increase the amount of sodium in your blood, resulting in the inability of your kidneys to keep up with its task of removing excess water. If your body needs to work harder than it should to remove excesses, this puts a lot of pressure on the heart to pump more blood to deliver to the organs.

Eat and Drink Everything in Moderation

If salt can do that to your body, then the same can be said for high levels of fat and sugar. Avoid food that have saturated fat, trans fat, added sugar, sweeteners, and vegetable shortenings. You will also be advised to lose weight or maintain an ideal weight to prevent complications like diabetes, joint problems, and others. Lastly, cut down on portions of food gradually until you get used to smaller portions in every meal, choose low-fat or dairy-free products, and always read the labels of food in groceries.

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